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Wedgwood Black Transferware Round Platter / Plate The Potters Wheel Creamware Embossed Border

$49.99

Brand Wedgwood

This lovely, black transfer printed creamware plate was made by Wedgwood exclusively for the renowned Canadian china shop named Beeshy's to commemorate their 85th anniversary. Beeshy's opened in 1854 in Ridgeway, Ontario and operated a 5000 sq. foot, Tudor styled shop for well over 100 years.  It was known throughout the Commonwealth for its selection of fine English china, particularly it's enormous Wedgwood showroom.  


The scene on the plate was inspired by another piece specially created for Beeshy's in 1928 by Wedgwood artist Harry Barnard (1862 - 1933).  Entitled 'The Potter', weighing 800 pounds, comprised of 43 pieces and measuring 50" on each side, it is the largest piece of black basalt ever made.  During the 1920s, the Beeshy family consulted with Kenneth Wedgwood, the first president of Wedgwood, USA.  He advised them to rebuild the shop front to resemble an old English china shop in the typical half-timbered Tudor style. The basalt relief showing an 18th-century English potter in his studio was the focal point. The relief remained on the facade of the building until 1995, the Beeshys sold the shop.  The basalt relief is now owned by and housed at the Royal Ontario Museum and is considered a national treasure.  It was removed from the building and replaced with a replica made of fiberglass.

The plate depicts the 18th century  potter at his wheel in his shop, surrounded by numerous pots of varied shapes and sizes.  

Above the potter depicted on the plate a ribbon contains the following quote by Omar Khayyan which reads:

"Within the potter's house surrounded by the shapes of clay"

It has a raised border of fruits; pineapple, grapes, pears, apples

Measures 10 3/4"

Condition: No chips, cracks and little, if any crazing. 

Last photos are of Beeshy's china shop, the fiberglass replica and the original invoice from Wedgwood  for the engraving of 'The Potter'